Resume/CV

Resume/CV

For academic positions the résumé is referred to as a CV. The CV must concisely convey key information. Keep in mind that the first task of a search committee is to reduce the applicant pool to a more manageable list of the most qualified candidates. At this stage in the process, a thirty to sixty second scan of your CV is probably all you can expect. In order to make it to the short list of candidates, your CV must be attractive, easy to read (establish a consistent form), and should succinctly present the qualifications and experience that qualify you for the position. Do not send a lengthy document that details everything you have ever done. Five pages is a adequate length for a concise CV at the junior level. For senior academic positions, CVs will be longer.

The general order of information on a CV is:

  1. Contact Information
    Provide you full name, address, telephone and fax numbers and e-mail.
  2. Education
    List in chronological order your educational history, starting from your undergraduate degree through to your current position.
  3. Professional Experience
    List in chronological order any professional experience you have had. If you have not had any, do not include this section. State any professional qualifications that you have.
  4. Honors and Awards
    List and honors and awards you have received, including fellowships. Do not include this section if you have nothing of note to place in here.
  5. Society Memberships
    List any professional or student societies that you are a member of and any leadership roles that you have played in these societies.
  6. Publications
    List all of your research publications in a consistent style. One style is to follow chronological order –starting with your first publication and ending with publications that are currently under review. You can chose to include publications that are in preparation – however these will generally be discarded by the selection committee. Strictly speaking, you should only include publications that are refereed – meaning only refereed journal and conference papers. However, if this section looks a little lean you could include
    poster presentations or reports to research sponsors, etc.
  7. Presentations
    If you have given any “invited” presentations of your work, list these together with the talk title, talk date and location.
  8. Teaching Experience
    List all of your teaching experience in chronological order. Include course evaluations if they are good. Also include any outreach/ teaching that has involved youth groups, citizens groups or K-12 education.
  9. Other Information
    Some people chose to list their interests and hobbies. If you are fluent in another language or have a special skill that you think is relevant to the position this can also be included.